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Learn Arabic in Rabat: Teaching

Let’s get you speaking Arabic in Rabat!

Students enrolled in language courses at the Arabic language school in Rabat have the opportunity to rapidly acquire Arabic through a communicative  immersion curriculum.

Each course (ie. MSA Beginner I level) takes four weeks to complete.
Each level (ie. MSA Beginners I, II & III) will generally take twelve weeks to complete.
Students may only proceed to the next course after successfully passing the course exam, completing the course project, and demonstrating the communication skills necessary to place in the next level.

Class size is restricted to a maximum of eight (sometimes up to 12) students.

  • 15 hours classroom language instruction (4 Arabic lessons per day, 5 days per week)
  • 05 hours instruction during cultural excursions
  • Tutoring and homework assistance during library hours
  • Comprehensive support and assistance

Modern Standard Arabic or Colloquial Moroccan?

If you are not sure whether to follow an MSA or CMA programme, please talk to the CESA staff. The majority of language students are interested in following the MSA language course as this is the main language of communication (and of the written word) throughout the Arab world.  CMA comprise of six courses offered across at three levels but is really only relevant to students who plan to live in Morocco.

Placement

Initial student placement is assessed based on the course requested as well as the previous study background indicated in our enrollment forms. On the first day of classes, a written placement test is administered as well as a one-on-one oral evaluation, conducted by the instructor. Final placement is then determined based on performance during the testing as well as student feedback regarding their appropriate level.
Depending on the student’s level, this testing can take as little as 15 minutes (as in the case of beginners) or as much as three hours (as in the case of Intermediate to Advanced level learners). This process ensures ideal course placement and enables us to allow students to enter on-going courses with fluidity and as little disruption as possible.

Methodology and Goals
Arabic Courses at the language school in Rabat are intended to merge seamlessly with Arabic courses taken at home institutions, while at the same time providing an atmosphere where vocabulary can both be acquired faster and retained with greater success.

Arabic Teaching Techniques

The concept of immersion is based on the idea that we acquire knowledge faster and better when we learn it naturally through comprehension. While “immersion” methodologies are widely considered modern teaching techniques, they are in fact nothing new. For as long as human beings have learned to speak we have acquired language by imitating and then comprehending the meanings behind the words we say. An immersion language curriculum merely imitates the natural processes we use to learn language as children from the environment around us.

In practice an immersion curriculum does not rely heavily on grammar drills or assignments in translation. Grammar is learned by inference and gentle corrections of speech by the teacher. At the beginning level of our Arabic classes teachers will speak as little English as possible (less than 5%). From the intermediate level onward English will not be spoken at all.

Several different types of immersion methodologies are incorporated into the curriculum. One methodology is task-based learning. During a task-based learning activity the focus of the classroom is the completion of a task and language is the instrument used to achieve it. The aim of this method is to create a need to learn and use language skills.

Another technique, Total Physical Response, is based on the theory that memory of a new language skill is enhanced when associated with physical movement. This method works especially well in learning commands as well as simple actions and nouns.

Simply put, the curriculum strategy is to involve students in a multi-faceted process of learning rather than simply lecturing to them. Students are encouraged to speak and use their new language skills, as much as possible, in order to incorporate them into memory. What this curriculum demands of students is merely that they be open to learning and willing to try to speak and practice the language skills the teacher wants them to produce.

Arabic Instructors

Each classroom is led by an experienced and enthusiastic Native speaking Arabic teacher. Our teachers all hold advanced degrees in Arabic literature, Law, or Applied Linguistics. Some have held positions as Professors of Arabic at distinguished Moroccan Universities. Read the credentials of our year round, full time Arabic teachers.

Academic Standards

All language courses at the Arabic Language School adhere to the National Standards set forth by the ACTFL (American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages) in collaboration with the US Department of Education.

Several different types of immersion methodologies are incorporated into the curriculum. The methodology is task-based learning. During a task-based learning activity the focus of the classroom is the completion of a task and the Arabic language is the instrument used to achieve it. The aim of this method is to create a need to learn Arabic and use Arabic language skills. Simply put, the curriculum strategy is to involve students in a multi-faceted process of learning rather than simply lecturing to them. Students are encouraged to speak Arabic and use their new language skills, as much as possible, in order to cement them as a part of memory. What this curriculum demands of students is merely that they be open to learning and willing to try to speak and practice Arabic skills the teacher wants them to produce. In practice an immersion curriculum does not rely heavily on grammar drills or assignments in translation. Grammar is learned by inference and gentle corrections of speech by the teacher. Please note that even at Beginner level, the Arabic teachers will speak as little English as possible. From intermediate level onward English will not be spoken at all.

Each classroom is led by an experienced and enthusiastic native speaking Arabic teacher. The teachers all hold advanced degrees in the Arabic language. Many of the instructors are also former Fullbright scholars who had the opportunity to experience teaching Arabic at American universities during a Fulbright exchange. They also have held positions as Professors of Arabic at distinguished Moroccan Universities. The primary textbook used in the Modern Standard Arabic course is the Al Kitab Fi Ta’allum Al Arabiya series.


 

Modern Standard Arabic

Programme Outline

The Modern Standard Arabic programme consists of three levels which are each divided into three core courses and additional optional intensive courses.

Beginner Level – (240 hours core) Course MSA B-I (80 hours)
Optional add on Course MSA B-I INT (40 hours)
Course MSA B-II (80 hours)
Optional add on Course MSA B-II INT (40 hours)
Course MSA B-III (80 hours)
Optional add on Course MSA B-III INT (40 hours)

Intermediate Level – (240 hours)

Course MSA N-I (80 hours)
Optional add on Course MSA N-I INT (40 hours)
Course MSA N-II (80 hours)
Optional add on Course MSA N-II INT (40 hours)
Course MSA N-III (80 hours)
Optional add on Course MSA N-III INT (40 hours)

Advanced Level – (240 hours)

Course MSA A-I (80 hours)
Optional add on Course MSA A-I INT (40 hours)
Course MSA A-II (80 hours)
Optional add on Course MSA A-II INT (40 hours)
Course MSA A-III (80 hours)
Optional add on Course MSA A-III INT (40 hours)

All textbooks and study materials are available for purchase or are provided on loan (with deposit).

Modern Standard Arabic (MSA)
MSA Language Level Structure and Teaching Outline
Modern Standard Arabic (MSA) is the standardized literary Arabic understood throughout the Arab speaking world. It is a modernized version of Classical Arabic, which is the language from which all Arab dialects get their roots. Classical Arabic is also the language of the Qur’an as well as the language of all Arab historic and religious texts.

MSA courses at the Arabic school are taught according to an immersive methodology. The primary texts used are from the renowned “Al Kitaab Fi Ta’allum Al Arabiya” by Georgetown University Press and other proven sources. Each of our Arabic courses, taught in 4 week blocks, provides a minimum of 80 contact hours.

All nine levels of Modern Standard Arabic are offered continuously. Students join the course at their level and then continue studying as long as they wish.

Standard Course:
Students taking the Standard course follow the MSA core course, with 20 hours per week of in class instruction time.
Intensive Course:
Students taking the Intensive course take both a |Standard MSA core course and a formal spoken Arabic course concurrently for a total of 30 hours per week of classroom instruction time.


MSA Language course objectives

Beginners I description

The Beginner I course in Modern Standard Arabic is designed for students with no prior knowledge of, exposure to, or experience with studying the Arabic language. This course will introduce students to listening, speaking, reading and writing skills as the standard means of communication in the Arab world. It will also introduce students to many aspects of Arab culture. All class exercises and activities are either task-based or student centered. By the end of the course students will be able to read and write using Arabic script. They will also learn to correct pronunciation, learn to distinguish different sounds in the language and verbally communicate on a basic level.
This course focuses on developing students’ vocabulary in contexts used in the textbook. They will learn simple grammatical structures and will listen to authentic materials related to subjects featured in the textbook, newspapers and other instructional materials.

Text Book & Materials
The primary texts used are from the renowned “Al Kitaab Fi Ta’allum Al Arabiya” by Georgetown University Press and other proven sources.

Evaluation and assessment
1. Active participation/Homework 20 %
2. Written Exam 40 %
3. Oral Exam 40 %

In addition to these specific written assignments, you should do the following on a daily basis if you want to excel in Arabic:
Review what was covered after each class, particularly new grammatical structures and/or usages, to make sure you fully understand how and when to use them.
Make flash cards—with the Arabic word on one side of the card and its equivalent in English on the other—for each new vocabulary word introduced either in the course texts or in class activities and discussions.
Review flash cards every day, sometimes starting with the Arabic side first and sometimes with the English side first.
Set aside the words you do not know and review these words two more times in the same day.
Ask questions in class whenever you need additional explanation to clarify new structures and how or when to use them.
Participate in the content-based learning activities in order to practice the Arabic language.
Practice speaking Arabic as much as possible, especially when you interact outside with native speakers outside of class as well as with your teacher and your classmates.

Additional Content-Based Learning Activities
In addition to classroom instruction time, students in the Beginning I level course are expected to participate in both mandatory and optional content based learning activities. These activities will further students’ exposure to Modern Standard Arabic and allow for greater retention of new vocabulary. These activities are graded on a participation basis.

ActivityFrequencyParticipation
Calligraphy/Handwriting2 hours per weekmandatory
Site visit excursions4 hours per weekmandatory
Cooking club2 hoursbi-weekly recommended
Guest Lectures2 hoursbi-weekly optional
Media club/Cinema Club
/Islamic Studies Club
2 hours per weekoptional

Beginners II description

The Beginner-II level course in Modern Standard Arabic is designed for students who can read and write using Arabic script but have very basic understanding of vocabulary. This course will further develop vocabulary, while introducing students to sentence structure and basic grammatical skills. It will continue to introduce students to many aspects of Arab culture. It will introduce proper use of an Arabic dictionary. All class exercises and activities are either task-based or student centered. By the end of the course, students will be able to discuss topics of both personal and professional interest such as politics, religion, culture, and economics.

Required Instructional Materials
1. The primary texts used are from the renowned “Al Kitaab Fi Ta’allum Al Arabiya” by Georgetown University Press and other proven sources.
2. Wehr, Hans. The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, 1994.

Evaluation and assessment
1. Active Class Participation 20%
Students should participate in classroom activities which target comprehension and language production. This requires the students to come prepared to participate.

Active participation entails the following:

(a) Class attendance.
Class attendance is necessary for the success of the whole learning process. Students who miss class hours without proper documentation will have that reflected in their overall course grade.

(b) Homework assignments:
Students are expected to submit their assignments on time.

2. Written exam (quizzes and Tests) 30%
Exams test students` mastery of vocabulary and grammar structures. They also include reading, writing and listening tasks to assess the effective use of language in context.
A typical exam contains 4 sections:
Listening Section: students will listen to an audio or video clip followed by general comprehension questions. Grammar Section: The understanding of grammar is tested through multiple choice or sentence completion tasks.
Reading Section: Reading comprehension will be tested by short texts to check the general understanding of the text.
Writing Section: At this level, students will be asked to write a paragraph to five about one of the topics they covered.

3. Oral exam 30%
The oral exam will evaluate the students’ ability to both correctly pronounce sounds and make their overall ideas understood. It also tests their ability to readily pronounce sentences in response to verbal prompts.

4. Project 20%
Students will research a topic of interest to them and develop a 10 minute presentation with the assistance of TA’s and under the guidance of their instructor. They will present this project to their peers at the end of the course.
In addition to these specific written assignments, students who want to excel in Arabic should do the following on a daily basis:
Review what was covered after each class, particularly new grammatical structures and/or usages, to make sure you fully understand how and when to use them.
Make flash cards—with the Arabic word on one side of the card and its equivalent in English on the other—for each new vocabulary word introduced either in the course texts or in class activities and discussions.
Review flash cards every day, sometimes starting with the Arabic side first and sometimes with the English side first.
Set aside the words you do not know and review these words two more times in the same day.
Ask questions in class whenever you need additional explanation to clarify new structures and how or when to use them.
Practice speaking Arabic as much as possible, especially when you interact with native speakers outside of class as well as with your teacher and your classmates.

Additional Content-Based Learning Activities
In addition to classroom instruction time, students in the Beginner II level course are expected to participate in both mandatory and optional content based learning activities. These activities will further students’ exposure to Modern Standard Arabic and allow for greater retention of new vocabulary. These activities are graded on a participation basis.

ActivityFrequencyParticipation
Calligraphy/Handwriting2 hours per weekrecommended
Site visit excursions4 hours per weekcompulsory
Cooking club2 hours bi-weeklycompulsory
Guest Lectures2 hours bi-weeklycompulsory
Media club/Cinema Club
/Islamic Studies Club
2 hours weeklycompulsory

Beginners III description

The Beginner-III course in Modern Standard Arabic is designed for students with at least 80 contact hours of prior study of the Arabic language. This course will further develop vocabulary, and introduce students to more complex sentence structure and higher level grammatical skills. It will continue to introduce students to many aspects of Arab culture. All class exercises and activities are either task-based or student centered. Aside from the primary textbook, students will also be exposed to other materials such as magazine articles, daily newspapers and Arabic Media broadcasts.

By the end of the course students would be able to reach the outcomes and the objectives for novice-high level speakers required by ACTFL- Proficiency Guidelines.
Listening:
A. Able to understand the general idea of short paragraphs.
B. Able to comprehend words and phrases from simple questions, statements, high-frequency commands, and courtesy formula. (May require repetition, rephrasing, slowed rate of speech for comprehension.)
Speaking:
A. Able to communicate by forming short answers.
B. Able to talk about themselves, people and places around them.
Reading:
A. Able to read short paragraphs, memos, emails, timetables, maps, and signs.
Writing:
A. Able to write some sentences and short paragraphs.

Required Instructional Materials
1. The primary texts used are from the renowned “Al Kitaab Fi Ta’allum Al Arabiya” by Georgetown University Press and other proven sources.
2. Wehr, Hans. The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, 1994.

Evaluation and assessment
1. Active Class Participation 20%
Students should participate in classroom activities which target comprehension and language production. This requires the students to come prepared to participate. Active participation entails the following:
(a) Class attendance. Class attendance is necessary for the success of the whole learning process. Students who miss class hours without proper documentation will have that reflected in their overall course grade.
(b) Homework assignments: Students are expected to submit their assignments on time.
2. Written exam (quizzes and Tests) 30%
Exams test students` mastery of vocabulary and grammar structures. They also include reading, writing and listening tasks to assess the effective use of language in context. A typical exam contains 4 sections: Listening Section: students will listen to an audio or video clip followed by general comprehension questions. Grammar Section: The understanding of grammar is tested through multiple choice or sentence completion tasks. Reading Section: Reading comprehension will be tested by short texts to check the general understanding of the text. Writing Section: At this level, students will be asked to write a paragraph to five about one of the topics they covered.
3. Oral exam 30%
The oral exam will evaluate the students’ ability to both correctly pronounce sounds and make their overall ideas understood. It also tests their ability to readily pronounce sentences in response to verbal prompts.
4. Project 20%
Students will research a topic of interest to them and develop a 10 minute presentation with the assistance of TA’s and under the guidance of their instructor. They will present this project to their peers at the end of the course.

In addition to these specific written assignments, students who want to excel in Arabic should do the following on a daily basis:
Review what was covered after each class, particularly new grammatical structures and/or usages, to make sure you fully understand how and when to use them.
Make flash cards—with the Arabic word on one side of the card and its equivalent in English on the other—for each new vocabulary word introduced either in the course texts or in class activities and discussions.
Review flash cards every day, sometimes starting with the Arabic side first and sometimes with the English side first.
Set aside the words you do not know and review these words two more times in the same day.
Ask questions in class whenever you need additional explanation to clarify new structures and how or when to use them.
Practice speaking Arabic as much as possible, especially when you interact with native speakers outside of class as well as with your teacher and your classmates.

Additional Content-Based Learning Activities
In addition to classroom instruction time, students in the Beginner III course are expected to participate in both mandatory and optional content based learning activities. These activities will further students’ exposure to Modern Standard Arabic and allow for greater retention of new vocabulary. These activities are graded on a participation basis.

ActivityFrequencyParticipation
Calligraphy/Handwriting2 hours per weekrecommended
Site visit excursions4 hours per weekcompulsory
Cooking club2 hours , bi-weeklycompulsory
Guest Lectures2 hours, bi-weeklycompulsory
Media club/Cinema Club
/Islamic Studies Club
2 hours per weekrecommended

By the end of the three Beginner Courses, students would be able to reach the outcomes and the objectives for novice-high level speakers required by ACTFL- Proficiency Guidelines.

Listening:
A. Able to understand the general idea of short paragraphs.
B. Able to comprehend words and phrases from simple questions, statements, high-frequency commands, and courtesy formula. (May require repetition, rephrasing, slowed rate of speech for comprehension.)

Speaking:
A. Able to communicate by forming short answers.
B. Able to talk about themselves, people and places around them.

Reading:
A. Able to read short paragraphs, memos, emails, timetables, maps,
and signs.

Writing:
A. Able to write some sentences and short paragraphs.

Intermediate I, II & III description

Modern Standard Arabic Intermediate Courses I, II & III are designed to further develop students’ proficiency and communication in the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. The main objective of these courses is to enhance the students’ abilities to converse on a variety of topics (e.g. the press, literature, social aspects, education, etc.). Another objective is to read, narrate and discuss authentic materials in Arabic. Students will gain a complete understanding of almost all of the basic grammar structures of Modern Standard Arabic. This knowledge will enable them to perform all of the functions listed in Chapters 5,6,7,8 till the end of Al-kitaab (part II). In addition, they will read and discuss one short story written in Modern Standard Arabic. A brief introduction to some aspects of the Arab literature and Classical writings of the Islamic world will be provided by the instructor on weekly basis.

By the end of this level, students would be able to reach the outcomes and the objectives for novice-high level speakers required by ACTFL- Proficiency Guidelines.

Listening:
A. Able to sustain understanding over longer stretches of connected discourse on a number of topics pertaining to different times and places.
Speaking:
A. Able to handle successfully most uncomplicated communicative tasks and social situations.
B. Able to initiate, sustain, and close a general conversation with a number of strategies appropriate to a range of circumstances and topics
C. Able to generally be understood even by interlocutors not accustomed to dealing with speakers at this level.
Reading:
A. Able to read consistently with full understanding simple connected texts dealing with basic personal and social needs about which the reader has personal interest and/or knowledge.
B. Able to discern some main ideas and information from texts at the next higher level featuring description and narration.
Writing:
A. Able to meet most practical writing needs and limited social demands.
B. Able to take notes in some detail on familiar topics and respond in writing to personal questions.
C. Able to write simple letters, brief synopses and paraphrases, summaries of biographical data, work and school experience.

Required Instructional Materials
1. The primary texts used are from the renowned “Al Kitaab Fi Ta’allum Al Arabiya” by Georgetown University Press and other proven sources.
2. Wehr, Hans. The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, 1994.
3. Elgibali, Alaa. Media Arabic: A Coursebook for Reading Arabic News . The American University in Cairo Press.

Evaluation and assessment
1. Active Class Participation 20%
Students should participate in the classroom activities, which targets understanding and language production. These activities should be done on frequent basis. This requires from the students to come prepared to participate. Active participation entails the following:
(a) Class attendance. Class attendance is more necessary for the success of the whole learning process. Students are allowed to miss only four hours of class for medical or emergency reasons. Teachers should be notified within 24 hours.
(b) Homework assignments: Students are expected to submit their assignments on time. Late assignments will be corrected but during office hours.

2. Written exam (quizzes and Tests) 30%
They will test students` mastery of vocabulary and grammar points. They also include reading, writing and listening tasks to assess the effective use of language in context. A typical exam contains 4 sections: Listening Section: students will listen to an audio or video clip followed by general comprehension questions. Grammar Section: The understanding of grammar is tested through multiple choice or sentence completion tasks. Reading Section: Reading comprehension will be tested by short texts to check the general understanding of the text. Writing Section: At this level, students will be asked to write a paragraph to five about one of the topics they covered.

3. Oral exam 30%
By the end of the course, you will meet with your instructor for an individual oral interview to assess your overall ability to speak Arabic.
The oral grade is based on 4 criteria: Pronunciation comprehensibility: refers to the clarity of the sounds and other phonetic features such as (Shadah , Tanween, etc.) Native-like speech is not expected. Vocabulary: refers to the knowledge of the words and phrases needed to carry out the conversation or situation. Structure: refers to the knowledge of forms and structure needed to carry out the conversation or situation. The structure should be correct and comprehensible. Fluency: refers to the easy and ready flow of words.

4. Project 20%
Students will research a topic of interest to them and develop a 10 minute presentation with the assistance of TA’s and under the guidance of their instructor. They will present this project to their peers at the end of the course.
In addition to these specific written assignments, students who want to excel in Arabic should do the following on a daily basis: Review what was covered after each class, particularly new grammatical structures and/or usages, to make sure you fully understand how and when to use them. Make flash cards—with the Arabic word on one side of the card and its equivalent in English on the other—for each new vocabulary word introduced either in the course texts or in class activities and discussions. Review flash cards every day, sometimes starting with the Arabic side first and sometimes with the English side first. Set aside the words you do not know and review these words two more times in the same day. Ask questions in class whenever you need additional explanation to clarify new structures and how or when to use them. Practice speaking Arabic as much as possible, especially when you interact with native speakers outside of class as well as with your teacher and your classmates.

Additional Content-Based Learning Activities
In addition to classroom instruction time, students in the Intermediate level courses are expected to participate in both mandatory and optional content based learning activities. These activities will further students’ exposure to Modern Standard Arabic and allow for greater retention of new vocabulary. These activities are graded on a participation basis.

ActivityFrequencyParticipation
Calligraphy/Handwriting2 hours per weekrecommended
Site visit excursions4 hours per weekcompulsory
Cooking club2 hoursbi-weekly recommended
Guest Lectures2 hoursbi-weekly compulsory
Media club/Cinema Club
/Islamic Studies Club
2 hours per weekcompulsory

Advanced Arabic description

The Advanced Arabic courses are designed to move learners from a stage where they have achieved all the basic grammatical skills, to being able to use language in a wider cultural context. Learners attempt to feel and emulate the educated native Arabic speaker.

At this level, learners will be introduced to the dialects spoken in the Arab world. Reading and listening materials are extensive and vary depending on the themes that interest the learners. Learners prepare newspaper and journal articles and, in order to improve oral/aural skills, they also study news bulletins, personal interviews, panel discussions and cultural programs recorded on audio and video cassettes and on DVD.
As time permits, learners are exposed to different forms of Arabic reflecting different styles. In addition, learners extend their vocabulary through watching extracts from/or entire Arabic movies.

By the end of the Advanced Level, it is expected that the learners should be able to converse in a clearly participatory fashion, to carry out a wide variety of communicative tasks that requires diverse discourse strategies.
Learners usually reach either Advanced or Advanced-Plus levels in listening, speaking, and reading, and Intermediate-High in writing (240 hours).

Primary textbooks:
Media Arabic. By, Julia Ashtung
“Al Kitaab Fi Ta’allum Al Arabiya” by Georgetown University Press
Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic. By, J.M. Cowan
Various audio-visual materials, texts from Arabic newspapers and magazines, etc.


 

Colloquial Moroccan Arabic

Colloquial Moroccan Arabic (CMA), also known as “darija,” is the spoken dialect of Morocco.  CMA is grammatically simpler and has a less voluminous vocabulary than Modern Standard Arabic.  While most CMA words find their root in MSA, many CMA words are borrowed from Spanish, French, and Berber.

CMA courses at the Arabic language school in Rabat are taught according to the immersion method.  CMA courses can be taken in conjunction with MSA courses at the Arabic school, but it is important for students to approach the two courses as two separate languages, so as not to interfere with the correct understanding of either language.  Each CMA Level can be completed in 4 weeks, and has a minimum of 80 contact hours. As with MSA courses, students may choose to study CMA for any length of time (minimum two weeks), beginning a course at their level and then continuing as long as they wish.

Programme Outline

The Colloquial Moroccan Arabic program consists of three levels which are each divided into two courses.

Beginning Level – (160 hours)
Course CMA B-I   (80 hours)
Course CMA B-II  (80 hours)

Intermediate Level – (160 hours)
Course CMA N-I   (80 hours)
Course CMA N-II  (80 hours)

Advanced Level – (160 hours)
Course CMA A-I   (80 hours)
Course CMA A-II  (80 hours)

All textbooks and study materials are available for purchase or are provided on loan (with deposit).
Students must prove eligibility for their requested course by successfully passing the course’s placement test.

Beginner Level

Colloquial Moroccan Arabic is the language most commonly spoken in Morocco. This course focuses on Spoken rather than Standard Written Arabic and will target Oral / Aural skills, speaking and listening. At this level, knowledge of Arabic orthography is not required and all texts contain phonetic transcriptions. By the end of the course, students will be able to master a number of social and communicative functions. (90 hours.)

Functions students will master include:
Introducing oneself, getting information about others
Identifying and describing people, objects and places and Giving and receiving directions
Narrating daily and habitual actions
Making appointments and reservations
Dealing with invitations and offers
Reading maps

Primary textbooks:
A Basic Course in Moroccan Arabic. By Richard S. Harrell and Mohammed Abu Taleb. Georgetown University Press.
Moroccan Arabic, by Peace Corps.

Intermediate Level

The course is a continuation of the CMA beginning level.  It covers grammatical structures with a greater focus on vocabulary mastery.  It also provides intensive oral drills supplemented by vocabulary exercises and a wide variety of real life situations.  By the end of the course, learners are expected to reach an intermediate – high level based on the ACTFL proficiency scale.  They will be able to perform various complex functions that are extensively employed in the Moroccan conversational situation. (90 hours.)

Primary textbooks:
A Basic Course in Moroccan Arabic. By Richard S. Harrell and Mohammed Abu Taleb.
Georgetown University Press.
Moroccan Arabic, by Peace Corps.

Advanced Level

This course has a two fold purpose: it provides students with a window on the social, intellectual and physical aspects of the Moroccan culture. Also, it presents an opportunity for learners to get insight into the diversity of the Moroccan linguistic situation while studying the major characteristics of CMA. By the end of the course, students will be able to understand the cultural connotations of some Moroccan proverbs and maxims, and understand Moroccan traditions and rituals.  They will also be able to converse and write about a wide of variety of topics.  The ability to read and write in Modern Standard Arabic is a pre-requisite for this course.  (90 hours.)

Primary textbooks:
A Basic Course in Moroccan Arabic. By Richard S. Harrell and Mohammed Abu Taleb.
Georgetown University Press.
Moroccan Arabic, by Peace Corps.